Tag Archives: Shukan Asahi Geino

‘Fuzoku bubble’ of ’80s supplied sizzling sex services

Shukan Asahi Geino Nov. 24As the “bubble economy” of the ’80s started to inflate, the nation’s sex industry rose to the occasion as well, so to speak, reports Shukan Asahi Geino (Nov. 24).

Dubbed the “fuzoku bubble,” the period largely began with the establishment of Monroe Walk in Kyoto in June 1980. It was the first no-pan kissa, or coffee shop in which women do not wear under garments. Other similar establishments opened in Osaka and Tokyo later that same year.

The shops featured topless waitresses in mini-skirts and stockings parading across a reflective flooring with fans to serve coffee for between 1,500 and 2,000 yen. A second boom occurred in 1984, when services were upped to include hand-jobs in private rooms for an additional 2,000 yen.

The nozoki heya made its debut in Osaka in 1981. The clubs offered a series of small private rooms with two-way mirrors that surrounded a large stage. For 2,000 yen, customers were able to view a highly sensual performance by a naked woman. Tissues were provided, and an additional 2,000-yen tip would allow for a private hand-job.

This service was considered the progenitor of conventional “fashion health” clubs, offering hand and mouth services, that predominate to this day.

“The mainstream brothels didn’t allow customers to select a particular woman,” says a fuzoku writer. “So this new system resulted in a huge boost in popularity.”

Indeed, nozoki joints were not offering coital sex, but things quickly escalated to include such offerings thereafter.

“While shops prohibited full service, they did allow it behind the scenes,” explains another fuzoku writer from that period. “It was dependent upon the particular shop. In fact, some girls quit because they were able to hear other customers moaning in erotic bliss in adjacent rooms.”

The “mistress bank” called Yugure-zoku (“evening wanderers”) was established in Tokyo’s Edogawa Ward in 1982. But in December of the next year, the establishment’s female manager was arrested on prostitution charges and operations ceased.

Until then, men paid 200,000 yen in membership fees to meet available women, who were charged up to 100,000 yen to register. At a meeting, the pair would agree upon terms of service.

The females, says another sex writer from the period, were not self-conscious about the arrangement. “Those who registered as mistresses didn’t share the notion that they were engaging in prostitution,” says the writer. (K.N.)

Source: “No-pan kissa aijin banku nozoki heya…” Shukan Asahi Geino (Nov. 24, pages 184-186)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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New law to clamp down on Osaka’s ‘legal herb’ market

Shukan Asahi Geino Nov. 3The Minami entertainment district of Osaka has seen a serious growth in the sales of drugs designed to fall within a legal gray zone, but law enforcement might get the upper hand with a new law, reports Shukan Asahi Geino (Nov. 3).

“Legal herbs” have documented adverse effects, but there are no laws regulating their possession and utilization, which has putting law enforcement in a difficult position.

“America-mura is known to be an area for drugs,” says a news reporter covering the society beat. “There are 20 clubs situated there, an area smaller than Shibuya, and many often receive illicit drugs, like weed, from foreigners. Pedestrians are approached out of nowhere for possible transactions.”

Dating back approximately one year, shops with signs reading “specializing in legal herbs” began to emerge. Now about 10 can be spotted in one area. With prices in the range of 1,000 to 3,000 yen per gram, most users are teenagers and those in their 20s.

The Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare defines “legal herbs” to be tea leaves that have had chemicals similar to speed or marijuana applied. The practice started to spread through Japan about a decade ago. When inhaled, the user will hallucinate or become physically excited.

A writer from a magazine that specializes in non-fiction stories tells the tabloid, “You can easily buy the drugs online or at shops. You can even spot them in Tokyo in areas like Shibuya, Shinjuku, and Ikebukuro. It also seems like sales are expanding to suburban areas.”

Some are brazenly inhaling the drugs in front of police boxes, the article reports. “You cam spot regulars smoking and sitting on benches just outside a shop,” says the same society reporter.

While the pharmaceutical law prohibits inhalation, most shops sell them as they would incense. This makes it difficult for police to issue citations.

That might change.

Sales volumes and prices went up during this past August and September. “Suppliers started to unload inventories before a revised pharmaceutical law was to go effect on October 20,” the writer from the same magazine is quoted.

The revised law added six chemicals, which will force most makers of legal herbs to change ingredients. Suppliers were subsequently forced to clean out inventories.

“They also started to supply drugs containing ingredients yet to be regulated,” continues the reporter. “What is scary is that suppliers themselves are not fully familiar with these ingredients. We hope this does not result in a rash of health-related incidents due to serious side effects.” (K.N.)

Source: “Ame-mura de ‘taima modoki’ doraggu ga dairyukochu keikan no mae de wakamono ga dodo to genkaku torippu shite,” Shukan Asahi Geino (Nov. 3, page 58)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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Tokyo trends: Deflation cutting hand-job prices to the bone

It’s a familiar nighttime routine: You are out in Shimbashi, drunk, and the last train has passed. What to do?

While pondering the predicament a young Chinese gal materializes on a nearby corner. “Excuse me, sir?”

Thus begins a survey of quickie sex services from weekly tabloid Shukan Asahi Geino (Sept. 15), which finds that prices are plummeting in the current deflationary environment.

“We can get you a room for 5,000 yen,” she continues.

“Ah, but I’ve only got 3,000 yen,” the crafty writer counters.

In Tokyo’s entertainment areas, below-the-belt services for 5,000 yen are in abundance, but many lucky lads are getting away with much less.

“A hand-job with light body-touching is an appealing package for girls who want to make fast cash,” comments a writer who covers underground businesses. “And for businessmen with tight wallets, it is an economical way to experience sexual pleasure.”

It was assumed that if prices were to fall too low customers would become cautious, but that has not been the case. “The trade has expanded into amateur girls,” the underground writer continues. “You know, to become involved in this business it doesn’t take much effort to recruit clients, and nowadays the competition to offer the lowest prices just keeps getting hotter.”

After finishing up in Shimbashi, the tabloid’s reporter moves over to Shinjuku’s Kabukicho red-light district, where he enters Anpuri-tei. The 20-minute course here runs a mere 2,700 yen and includes a hand service (2,000 yen) and room rental (700 yen).

Asagei’s writer enters a room and picks up the phone. Soon after an 18-year-old with big eyes, similar in appearance to actress Haruka Ayase, appears before him.

Various options are included, such as verbal abuse, blowing, the use of lotion, and panty and bra peeks. However, when time is up, the stroking stops — win or lose. But frankly, are there any losers at this price?

Outfitted in a tank top and pink underwear and seated atop a pillow, she utters a polite “excuse me” before proceeding with the pulling process.

The reporter winds up coming out on top, even vowing a return visit. Should you, dear reader, be interested in a similar experience Anpuri-tei’s number is provided: 03-6233-7499. And tell ‘em Shukan Asahi Geino sent ya! (K.N.)

Source: “Kabukicho de tekoki 2,7000 yen saiyasune wo koshin defure fuzoku ga oyaji no kahanshin wo sukuu!” Shukan Asahi Geino (Sept. 15, page 58)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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Perverted pics providing peeks at particular private parts proving popular in Akihabara

Shukan Asahi Geino Sept. 8A new erotic photo book is achieving brisk sales in spite of not revealing any of the faces of the female models nor full nudity, reports weekly tabloid Shukan Asahi Geino (Sep. 8).

The magazine says that the book emphasizes the subtle aspects of swimsuits and uniforms: The skirt of a sailor suit gently rises to expose high up a thigh; a sock is visible just before a change into a swimsuit; and an exercise session gently reveals a bare midriff.

The book “Natsufuku Joshi (Summer Clothing Girls, 夏服女子),” by Million Publishing, is recording tremendous sales, having ascended to the top of the photo book section of Amazon.jp at the end if July (and still holding that position now).

“Over the last year or two, it’s become something of a trend for this type of book to appear on shelves,” says Shunichi Kamada, manager of the Aratama book shop, located in Tokyo’s Akihabara district. “By not showing the faces of the models, the reader’s imagination and fantasies can be expanded. This particular title has become its own genre.”

As Kamada indicates, there are various titles of this type available, so the success of “Natsufuku Joshi” has even surprised the creators.

Yuki Sugawara, who edited the book, says that promotion was limited. “The Akibablog, which features current events in Akihabara, kick-started interest. What attracted the most attention was a quote that read, ‘We can probably smell that obi‘” — referring to a belt that wraps around a summer kimono.

The photographer behind the pictures is Masaki Okado. “I didn’t use posed pics,” he explains. “I just focused on moments where a girl momentarily drops her guard while wearing summer clothes.”

Natsufuku JoshiIt was a matter of focusing on eroticism hidden within everyday activities — that’s what is driving sales, says the photographer. “While looking at other books, I felt that there was something that wasn’t right,” he says. “Perhaps this has something to do with the particular photographer’s personal feelings. We decided to incorporate the perspective of various staff members after thorough discussions to come up with a consensus.”

“The camera angles and lighting are also carefully crafted,” bookstore manager Kamada adds. “Focusing on high, dark blue socks is also an example of the book’s attention to details.”

“Natsufuku Joshi” (2,100 yen) also comes with a 60-minute DVD. “It’s a good buy,” Kamada concludes. (K.N.)

Source: “Kaonashi hadakanashi demo uriage ichii, ‘Natsufuku Joshi’ no chirarizumu ga ero sugiru,” Shukan Asahi Geino (Sept. 8, page 58)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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Radiation fears fuel abuse of Fukushima fuzoku gals

Shukan Asahi Geino June 23It has been widely reported that products sourced from the agriculture and fisheries industries of Fukushiima Prefecture have faced intense scrutiny since the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11. But who would have thought that bias would bode for blow-jobs, too?

Freelance fuzoku journalist Teruhiko Aoyama tells weekly tabloid Shukan Asahi Geino (June 23) that even before the nuclear incident, some regulars at sex clubs liked to look down on girls and verbally berate them. “Sadistic customers tend to fall in that category,” says the sex scribe, “and now they’ll give girls a hard time when they find out they are from Fukushima.”

It is common for many shops to disclose the hometowns of girls as a means of introduction. Prior to the earthquake, Fukushima locals carried an image of being passionate and nice. Now it is only about radiation. The magazine cites one deri heru (out-call) shop called Umichan in which an exchange regarding a Fukushima gal might go something like, “I forgot her name, but is the radiation here today?”

Fukushima working girls who moved to Tokyo before March 11 and those who came to the capital thereafter are now hiding their origins.

“The fuzoku industry is competitive,” says a reporter of an evening daily responsible for the fuzoku section. “Deri heru shops used to never offer a deep kiss but today that’s a common service. So now, when a (Fukushima) girl tries to give a kiss as a way of a greeting, a customer will refuse. They’ll say the saliva may contain radiation. The ’69′ service is a no-no because love juice may contain radiation, and also no blow-jobs. Some girls have become very hurt by these conditions.”

In one case, a client said to a girl, “What are you going to do from now? Don’t have kids. In Chernobyl, kids became deformed. Yours will be too.”

Fuzoku journalist Aoyama continues, “With hitozuma shops” — that is, establishments staffed by married ladies — “the conversation usually starts off with, ‘How old is your kid?’ Then once it is revealed that she is from Fukushima, they’ll look at her as if she’s really dirty, like trash. Then the client will suddenly ask to change a girl prior to the commencement of service. Some guys will even file a complaint with the shop.”

One out-call girl from Fukushima was told by a client to wash her hair because the thought of radiation was making it difficult for him to get hard.

Some managers are suggesting that girls lie and say they are from Akita or Yamagata prefectures, but the slight difference in accents makes that challenging.

A female employee at a hitozuma shop tells the magazine that the sight of Prime Minister Kan on television makes her sick. While she was lucky to win temporary housing, she adds, “You still have to pay utility bills. I was hoping that donations would cover that but I haven’t received anything yet. I am a single mom. This has left me with no choice but to work at a fuzoku shop. But in being from Fukushima, I get mistreated.

“Politicians are only concerned about their power,” she continues. “I don’t want to see Kan’s face.”

Aoyama says that some some clients are going so far as to carry Geiger counters with them to hotel rooms. “They’ll check the radiation level by putting it against the girl’s privates,” he says. (A.T.)

Source: “Fukushima shushin fuzokujo no hoshano sabetsu ga hajimatta, kyaku no fera kyohi ni Akita shushin to uso wo,” Shukan Asahi Geino (June 23, pages 184-185)

Note: Brief extracts from Japanese vernacular media in the public domain that appear here were translated and summarized under the principle of “fair use.” Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the translations. However, we are not responsible for the veracity of their contents. The activities of individuals described herein should not be construed as “typical” behavior of Japanese people nor reflect the intention to portray the country in a negative manner. Our sole aim is to provide examples of various types of reading matter enjoyed by Japanese.

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